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Noradrenergic Transmission at Alpha1-Adrenergic Receptors in the Ventral Periaqueductal Gray Modulates Arousal.

Authors
  • Porter-Stransky, Kirsten A1
  • Centanni, Samuel W2
  • Karne, Saumya L1
  • Odil, Lindsay M3
  • Fekir, Sinda3
  • Wong, Jennifer C1
  • Jerome, Canaan1
  • Mitchell, Heather A1
  • Escayg, Andrew1
  • Pedersen, Nigel P4
  • Winder, Danny G2
  • Mitrano, Darlene A5
  • Weinshenker, David6
  • 1 Department of Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. , (Georgia)
  • 2 Department of Molecular Physiology and Biophysics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee; Vanderbilt Center for Addiction Research, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee.
  • 3 Program in Neuroscience, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, Virginia.
  • 4 Department of Neurology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. , (Georgia)
  • 5 Program in Neuroscience, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, Virginia; Department of Molecular Biology and Chemistry, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, Virginia.
  • 6 Department of Human Genetics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Georgia)
Type
Published Article
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2019
Volume
85
Issue
3
Pages
237–247
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2018.07.027
PMID: 30269865
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Dysregulation of arousal is symptomatic of numerous psychiatric disorders. Previous research has shown that the activity of dopamine (DA) neurons in the ventral periaqueductal gray (vPAG) tracks with arousal state, and lesions of vPAGDA cells increase sleep. However, the circuitry controlling these wake-promoting DA neurons is unknown. This study combined designer receptors exclusively activated by designer drugs (DREADDs), behavioral pharmacology, electrophysiology, and immunoelectron microscopy in male and female mice to elucidate mechanisms in the vPAG that promote arousal. Activation of locus coeruleus projections to the vPAG or vPAGDA neurons induced by DREADDs promoted arousal. Similarly, agonist stimulation of vPAG alpha1-adrenergic receptors (α1ARs) increased latency to fall asleep, whereas α1AR blockade had the opposite effect. α1AR stimulation drove vPAGDA activity in a glutamate-dependent, action potential-independent manner. Compared with other dopaminergic brain regions, α1ARs were enriched on astrocytes in the vPAG, and mimicking α1AR transmission specifically in vPAG astrocytes via Gq-DREADDS was sufficient to increase arousal. In general, the wake-promoting effects observed were not accompanied by hyperactivity. These experiments revealed that vPAG α1ARs increase arousal, promote glutamatergic input onto vPAGDA neurons, and are abundantly expressed on astrocytes. Activation of locus coeruleus inputs, vPAG astrocytes, or vPAGDA neurons increase sleep latency but do not produce hyperactivity. Together, these results support an arousal circuit whereby noradrenergic transmission at astrocytic α1ARs activates wake-promoting vPAGDA neurons via glutamate transmission. Copyright © 2018 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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