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Non-ionic surfactant vesicles as a carrier system for dermal delivery of (+)-Catechin and their antioxidant effects.

Authors
  • Li, Danhui1
  • Martini, Nataly1
  • Liu, Mengyang1
  • Falconer, James R2
  • Locke, Michelle1, 3
  • Wu, Zimei1
  • Wen, Jingyuan1
  • 1 School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medical and Health Sciences, The University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
  • 2 School of Pharmacy, The University of Queensland, Pharmacy Australia Centre of Excellence, Brisbane, QLD, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Middlemore Hospital, Counties Manukau District Health Board, Auckland, New Zealand. , (New Zealand)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Drug Targeting
Publisher
Informa UK (Taylor & Francis)
Publication Date
Mar 01, 2021
Volume
29
Issue
3
Pages
310–322
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1080/1061186X.2020.1835923
PMID: 33044095
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Numerous skin disorders and diseases are related to oxidative stress. The application of an antioxidant, serving as a strong defense agent against oxidation, is of great interest in dermatology yet remains challenging for delivery. This paper aimed to develop a niosome carrier system to deliver the antioxidant (+) Catechin into the skin. (+) Catechin-loaded niosomes were prepared using film hydration technique and the physicochemical properties of drug-loaded niosomes were characterised and investigated by a series of in vitro and ex vivo studies. The optimised formulation displayed an acceptable size in nanoscale (204 nm), high drug entrapment efficiency (49%) and amorphous state of drug in niosomes. It was found that (+) Catechin-loaded niosomes could effectively prolong the drug release. Drug deposition in the viable layers of human skin was significantly enhanced when niosomal carriers were applied (p < 0.05). Compared to the pure drug, the niosomal formulation had a greater protective effect on the human skin fibroblasts (Fbs). This is consistent with the observation of internalisation of niosomes by Fbs which was concentration-, time- and temperature-dependent, via an energy-dependent process of endocytosis. The research highlighted that niosomes are potential topical carriers for dermal delivery of antioxidants in skin-care and pharmaceutical products.

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