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Non-human primates as a model for aging.

Authors
  • Colman, Ricki J1
  • 1 Department of Cell and Regenerative Biology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Wisconsin Institutes for Medical Research, 1111 Highland Avenue, Madison, WI 53705, USA; Wisconsin National Primate Research Center, University of Wisconsin, 1220 Capitol Court, Madison, WI 53715, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochimica et biophysica acta. Molecular basis of disease
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2018
Volume
1864
Issue
9 Pt A
Pages
2733–2741
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.bbadis.2017.07.008
PMID: 28729086
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

There has been, and continues to be, a dramatic shift in the human population towards older ages necessitating biomedical research aimed at better understanding the basic biology of aging and age-related diseases and facilitating new and improved therapeutic options. As it is not practical to perform the breadth of this research in humans, animal models are necessary to recapitulate the complexity of the aging environment. The mouse model is most frequently chosen for these endeavors, however, they are frequently not the most appropriate model. Non-human primates, on the other hand, are more closely related to humans and recapitulate the human aging process and development of age-related diseases. Extensive aging research has been performed in the well-characterized rhesus macaque aging model. More recently, the common marmoset, a small non-human primate with a shorter lifespan, has been explored as a potential aging model. This model holds particular promise as an aging disease model in part due to the successful creation of transgenic marmosets. Limitations to the use of non-human primates in aging research exist but can be mitigated somewhat by the existence of available resources supported by the National Institutes of Health. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Animal models of aging - edited by "Houtkooper Riekelt". Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

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