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Is There a Nonadditive Interaction Between Spontaneous and Evoked Activity? Phase-Dependence and Its Relation to the Temporal Structure of Scale-Free Brain Activity.

Authors
  • Huang, Zirui1
  • Zhang, Jianfeng2, 3
  • Longtin, André4
  • Dumont, Grégory1, 4
  • Duncan, Niall W1, 2, 5
  • Pokorny, Johanna6
  • Qin, Pengmin1, 5
  • Dai, Rui2, 3, 7
  • Ferri, Francesca1
  • Weng, Xuchu2, 3
  • Northoff, Georg1, 2, 3, 5
  • 1 Institute of Mental Health Research, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1Z 7K4, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Center for Cognition and Brain Disorders, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 311121, PR China. , (China)
  • 3 Zhejiang Key Laboratory for Research in Assessment of Cognitive Impairments, Hangzhou Normal University, Hangzhou 310015, PR China. , (China)
  • 4 Department of Physics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 5 Brain and Consciousness Research Center, Taipei Medical University-Shuang Ho Hospital, New Taipei City 23561, Taiwan. , (Taiwan)
  • 6 Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 2S2, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 7 School of Life Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510613, PR China. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cerebral Cortex
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2017
Volume
27
Issue
2
Pages
1037–1059
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/cercor/bhv288
PMID: 26643354
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The aim of our study was to use functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate how spontaneous activity interacts with evoked activity, as well as how the temporal structure of spontaneous activity, that is, long-range temporal correlations, relate to this interaction. Using an extremely sparse event-related design (intertrial intervals: 52-60 s), a novel blood oxygen level-dependent signal correction approach (accounting for spontaneous fluctuations using pseudotrials) and phase analysis, we provided direct evidence for a nonadditive interaction between spontaneous and evoked activity. We demonstrated the discrepancy between the present and previous observations on why a linear superposition between spontaneous and evoked activity can be seen by using co-occurring signals from homologous brain regions. Importantly, we further demonstrated that the nonadditive interaction can be characterized by phase-dependent effects of spontaneous activity, which is closely related to the degree of long-range temporal correlations in spontaneous activity as indexed by both power-law exponent and phase-amplitude coupling. Our findings not only contribute to the understanding of spontaneous brain activity and its scale-free properties, but also bear important implications for our understanding of neural activity in general.

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