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Non-optimal levels of dietary selenomethionine alter splenocyte response and modify oxidative stress markers in female mice.

Authors
  • Vega, Libia
  • Rodríguez-Sosa, Miriam
  • García-Montalvo, Eliud A
  • Del Razo, Luz María
  • Elizondo, Guillermo
Type
Published Article
Journal
Food and Chemical Toxicology
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2007
Volume
45
Issue
7
Pages
1147–1153
Identifiers
PMID: 17306430
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Many studies evaluating the effects of selenium (Se) status on immunity utilize inorganic Se, although selenomethionine (Se-Met) has been suggested to be more bioavailable and less toxic. In the current study, we investigated the effects of dietary Se-Met on immune system function and cellular redox status in C57BL/6N female mice fed with low (0.02 ppm), sufficient (0.2 ppm, control group), or excess Se-Met (2 ppm) in the diet for 50 days. Low Se-Met intake reduced glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and glutathione concentration without modifying lipoperoxidation. While low Se-Met intake also reduced the number of B cells in the spleen, it increased mitogen-induced proliferation, IL-4 and IL-12 secretion when compared to the sufficient Se-Met intake group. In comparison to controls, excess Se-Met intake increased splenocyte proliferation and reduced B cell numbers, IL-4, and IL-12 secretion without affecting oxidative stress markers. These data suggest that Se-Met supplementation should be carefully evaluated as it many influence immune function.

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