Non-Invasive monitoring of diaphragmatic timing by means of surface contact sensors: An experimental study in dogs

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Non-Invasive monitoring of diaphragmatic timing by means of surface contact sensors: An experimental study in dogs

Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Sep 08, 2004
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Design
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Abstract

1471-2466-4-8.fm ral ss BioMed CentBMC Pulmonary Medicine Open AcceTechnical advance Non-Invasive monitoring of diaphragmatic timing by means of surface contact sensors: An experimental study in dogs José Antonio Fiz*1, Raimon Jané2, Abel Torres2, Josep Morera1, Batxi Galdiz3, Joaquín Gea4 and Alejandro Grassino5 Address: 1Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Universitario Germans Trias i Pujol, Badalona, Barcelona, Spain, 2Dept. ESAII, Centre de Recerca en Enginyeria Biomèdica, UPC, Barcelona, Spain, 3Servicio de Neumología, Hospital Cruces, Baracaldo, Bilbao, Spain, 4Servicio de Neumología, Hospital del Mar, Barcelona, Spain and 5Dept. Medicine, Notre Dame Hospital, Univ. Montreal, Montreal, Quebec, Canada Email: José Antonio Fiz* - [email protected]; Raimon Jané - [email protected]; Abel Torres - [email protected]; Josep Morera - [email protected]; Batxi Galdiz - [email protected]; Joaquín Gea - [email protected]; Alejandro Grassino - [email protected] * Corresponding author Abstract Background: Non-invasive monitoring of respiratory muscle function is an area of increasing research interest, resulting in the appearance of new monitoring devices, one of these being piezoelectric contact sensors. The present study was designed to test whether the use of piezoelectric contact (non-invasive) sensors could be useful in respiratory monitoring, in particular in measuring the timing of diaphragmatic contraction. Methods: Experiments were performed in an animal model: three pentobarbital anesthetized mongrel dogs. The motion of the thoracic cage was acquired by means of a piezoelectric contact sensor placed on the costal wall. This signal is compared with direct measurements of the diaphragmatic muscle length, made by sonomicrometry. Furthermore, to assess the diaphragmatic function other respiratory signals were acquired: respiratory airflow and transdiaphragmatic pressure. Diaphragm contraction time was estimated with these four signals. Using diaphragm length signal as reference, contra

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