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NMR spectroscopy of 14-3-3ζ reveals a flexible C-terminal extension: differentiation of the chaperone and phosphoserine-binding activities of 14-3-3ζ.

Authors
  • Williams, Danielle M1
  • Ecroyd, Heath
  • Goodwin, Katy L
  • Dai, Huanqin
  • Fu, Haian
  • Woodcock, Joanna M
  • Zhang, Lixin
  • Carver, John A
  • 1 School of Chemistry and Physics, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochemical Journal
Publisher
Portland Press
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2011
Volume
437
Issue
3
Pages
493–503
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1042/BJ20102178
PMID: 21554249
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Intracellular 14-3-3 proteins bind to many proteins, via a specific phosphoserine motif, regulating diverse cellular tasks including cell signalling and disease progression. The 14-3-3ζ isoform is a molecular chaperone, preventing the stress-induced aggregation of target proteins in a manner comparable with that of the unrelated sHsps (small heat-shock proteins). 1H-NMR spectroscopy revealed the presence of a flexible and unstructured C-terminal extension, 12 amino acids in length, which protrudes from the domain core of 14-3-3ζ and is similar in structure and length to the C-terminal extension of mammalian sHsps. The extension stabilizes 14-3-3ζ, but has no direct role in chaperone action. Lys(49) is an important functional residue within the ligand-binding groove of 14-3-3ζ with K49E 14-3-3ζ exhibiting markedly reduced binding to phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated ligands. The R18 peptide binds to the binding groove of 14-3-3ζ with high affinity and also reduces the interaction of 14-3-3ζ ligands. However, neither the K49E mutation nor the presence of the R18 peptide affected the chaperone activity of 14-3-3ζ, implying that the C-terminal extension and binding groove of 14-3-3ζ do not mediate interaction with target proteins during chaperone action. Other region(s) in 14-3-3ζ are most likely to be involved, i.e. the protein's chaperone and phosphoserine-binding activities are functionally and structurally separated.

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