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Nitrite and nitric oxide are important in the adjustment of primary metabolism during the hypersensitive response in tobacco.

Authors
  • Mur, Luis A J1
  • Kumari, Aprajita2
  • Brotman, Yariv3
  • Zeier, Jurgen4
  • Mandon, Julien5
  • Cristescu, Simona M5
  • Harren, Frans5
  • Kaiser, Werner M6
  • Fernie, Alisdair R3
  • Gupta, Kapuganti Jagadis2
  • 1 Institute of Environmental and Rural Science, Aberystwyth University, Edward Llwyd Building, Aberystwyth, UK.
  • 2 National Institute of Plant Genome Research, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi, India. , (India)
  • 3 Max-Planck-Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, Am Mühlenberg, Golm-Potsdam, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 4 Institute of Plant Molecular Ecophysiology, Heinrich-Heine-Universität Universitätsstrasse, Düsseldorf, Germany. , (Germany)
  • 5 Radboud University, Life Science Trace Gas Facility, Molecular and Laser Physics, Institute for Molecules and Materials, GL Nijmegen, The Netherlands. , (Netherlands)
  • 6 Julius-von-Sachs-Institut für Biowissenschaften; Lehrstuhl für Molekulare Pflanzenphysiologie und Biophysik; Julius-von-Sachs-Platz, Wuerzburg, Germany. , (Germany)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Experimental Botany
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Aug 29, 2019
Volume
70
Issue
17
Pages
4571–4582
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/jxb/erz161
PMID: 31173640
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Nitrate and ammonia deferentially modulate primary metabolism during the hypersensitive response in tobacco. In this study, tobacco RNAi lines with low nitrite reductase (NiRr) levels were used to investigate the roles of nitrite and nitric oxide (NO) in this process. The lines accumulate NO2-, with increased NO generation, but allow sufficient reduction to NH4+ to maintain plant viability. For wild-type (WT) and NiRr plants grown with NO3-, inoculation with the non-host biotrophic pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola induced an accumulation of nitrite and NO, together with a hypersensitive response (HR) that resulted in decreased bacterial growth, increased electrolyte leakage, and enhanced pathogen resistance gene expression. These responses were greater with increases in NO or NO2- levels in NiRr plants than in the WT under NO3- nutrition. In contrast, WT and NiRr plants grown with NH4+ exhibited compromised resistance. A metabolomic analysis detected 141 metabolites whose abundance was differentially changed as a result of exposure to the pathogen and in response to accumulation of NO or NO2-. Of these, 13 were involved in primary metabolism and most were linked to amino acid and energy metabolism. HR-associated changes in metabolism that are often linked with primary nitrate assimilation may therefore be influenced by nitrite and NO production. © The Author(s) 2019. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: [email protected]

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