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NIR fluorescence for monitoring in vivo scaffold degradation along with stem cell tracking in bone tissue engineering.

Authors
  • Kim, Soon Hee1
  • Park, Ji Hoon2
  • Kwon, Jin Seon2
  • Cho, Jae Gu3
  • Park, Kate G4
  • Park, Chan Hum5
  • Yoo, James J6
  • Atala, Anthony6
  • Choi, Hak Soo7
  • Kim, Moon Suk8
  • Lee, Sang Jin9
  • 1 Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA; Nano-Bio Regenerative Medical Institute, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, 24252, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA; Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon, 443-759, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA; Gordon Center for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
  • 4 Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Korea University College of Medicine, Guro-dong 80 Guro-gu, Seoul, 152-703, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 5 Nano-Bio Regenerative Medical Institute, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon, 24252, Republic of Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 6 Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA.
  • 7 Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Korea University College of Medicine, Guro-dong 80 Guro-gu, Seoul, 152-703, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: [email protected] , (North Korea)
  • 8 Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon, 443-759, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: [email protected] , (North Korea)
  • 9 Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine, Wake Forest School of Medicine, Medical Center Boulevard, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biomaterials
Publication Date
Aug 06, 2020
Volume
258
Pages
120267–120267
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2020.120267
PMID: 32781325
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Stem cell-based tissue engineering has the potential to use as an alternative for autologous tissue grafts; however, the contribution of the scaffold degradation along with the transplanted stem cells to in vivo tissue regeneration remains poorly understood. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging has great potential to monitor implants while avoiding autofluorescence from the adjacent host tissue. To utilize NIR imaging for in vivo monitoring of scaffold degradation and cell tracking, we synthesized 800-nm emitting NIR-conjugated PCL-ran-PLLA-ran-PGA (ZW-PCLG) copolymers with three different degradation rates and labeled 700-nm emitting lipophilic pentamethine (CTNF127) on the human placental stem cells (CT-PSCs). The 3D bioprinted hybrid constructs containing the CT-PSC-laden hydrogel together with the ZW-PCLG scaffolds demonstrate that NIR fluorescent imaging enables tracking of in vivo scaffold degradation and stem cell fate for bone regeneration in a rat calvarial bone defect model. This NIR-based monitoring system can be effectively utilized to study cell-based tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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