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Nickel and cobalt adsorption on hydroxyapatite: a study for the de-metalation of electronic industrial wastewaters

Authors
  • Ferri, Michele1
  • Campisi, Sebastiano1
  • Gervasini, Antonella1
  • 1 Università degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica, via Camillo Golgi 19, Milano, 20133, Italy , Milano (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Adsorption
Publisher
Springer US
Publication Date
Mar 27, 2019
Volume
25
Issue
3
Pages
649–660
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10450-019-00066-w
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

In the present study, the Ni(II) and Co(II) adsorption efficiency and selectivity, as well adsorption mechanisms on a stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HAP) surface have been investigated. Characterization studies (N2 adsorption/desorption and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) analyses) and adsorption tests under various operative conditions provided detailed information about the use of HAP in the de-metalation of wastewaters containing Ni and Co as polluted metal species. The sorption capacity of HAP has been evaluated by static batch adsorption tests varying initial concentration of Ni(II) and Co(II) species (from ca. 0.25 to 4.3 mM), contact time (from 15 min to 24 h), and pH (from 4 to 9) operative parameters. Proposed mechanisms of adsorption of Ni(II) and Co(II) on HAP surface are ion-exchange and surface complexation; a partial contribution of chemical precipitation from bulk solution should be considered at pH 9. In addition, adsorption isotherms of Ni(II) and Co(II) on HAP have been collected at 30 °C and pH 4 and modeled by employing different equations. The maximum sorption capacities have been quantified as 0.317 mmol gHAP-1\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\text{g}}_{{{\text{HAP}}}}^{{ - 1}}$$\end{document} (18.6 mg gHAP-1\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\text{g}}_{{{\text{HAP}}}}^{{ - 1}}$$\end{document}) and 0.382 mmol gHAP-1\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\text{g}}_{{{\text{HAP}}}}^{{ - 1}}$$\end{document} (22.5 mg gHAP-1\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \usepackage{amsmath} \usepackage{wasysym} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{upgreek} \setlength{\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \begin{document}$${\text{g}}_{{{\text{HAP}}}}^{{ - 1}}$$\end{document}) for Ni(II) and Co(II), respectively. Selectivity to Co and Ni in the adsorption process on HAP has also been investigated; HAP has higher affinity towards Co than Ni species (Co:Ni = 2.5:1, molar ratio).

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