Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Newton’s Laws, G-forces and the impact on the brain

Authors
  • Evans, Vicki1
  • 1 Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney
Type
Published Article
Journal
Australasian Journal of Neuroscience
Publisher
Exeley Inc.
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2020
Volume
30
Issue
1
Pages
24–29
Identifiers
DOI: 10.21307/ajon-2020-003
Source
Exeley
Keywords
License
Green

Abstract

The thrill to go fast and push boundaries is something that many seek. From John Stapp’s rocket sled at Edwards Air Force Base in the late 1950’s to todays’ Formula 1 drivers, the “need for speed” is broadcast across TV screens weekly. So too are the horror stories of crashes, many at over 300km/hr. Yet “need for speed” continues. It appears that the higher and faster the rollercoaster, the better. This leads to several questions. How does the brain stand up to speed and G-forces? Do Newton’s Laws still have reference in today’s world? There has been much attention in the general press on the possibility that high G-force rollercoasters are inducing brain injury in riders. However, research does not wholeheartedly support this notion, but rather the risk of brain injury from a rollercoaster is not in the rides, but in the rider – caused by previously undetected brain or neck conditions. That said there is some truth that high G-forces do affect the brain at a chemical and structural level. This paper will discuss the mechanism of head injury at speed and generally what Newton’s Law means in a neurological setting in todays’ world. Formula 1 racing and rollercoaster rides will be evaluated within a neuroscience context.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times