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Newcastle disease in wild water birds in western Canada, 1990.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Canadian veterinary journal. La revue vétérinaire canadienne
Publication Date
Volume
34
Issue
6
Pages
353–359
Identifiers
PMID: 17424240
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

This report describes the investigation of mortality of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus), white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhynchos), and gulls (Larus spp.) in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba during late summer 1990. Techniques used varied among areas, but virological and histopathological examination of birds was done in each area. The major clinical sign in cormorants was inability to fly, often with unilateral wing or leg paralysis. Focal nonsuppurative inflammation was present in the brain and spinal cord of cormorants and pelicans. Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was isolated from cormorants, a pelican, and a ring-billed gull (Larus delawarensls) from Saskatchewan. Cormorants from Alberta were positive for NDV in an immunofluorescent test. Most of the viruses were classed as velogenic and all had a similar monoclonal antibody profile to viruses from the 1970 to 1974 panzootic. Approximately half of cormorant, pelican, and gull eggs collected from affected colonies in the spring of 1991 had antibody to NDV. Antibody was also present in cormorant eggs from the Great Lakes. No unusual mortality was detected at any colony in 1991. Fledgling cormorants and gulls from colonies where mortality occurred in 1990 did not have antibody to NDV in June-July 1991. The overall extent of mortality among water birds and the source of the virus were not determined.

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