Affordable Access

The new urban poor: the Tobas indians.

Authors
  • Bou, L C
Type
Published Article
Journal
Development in practice
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2000
Volume
10
Issue
1
Pages
71–76
Identifiers
PMID: 12295960
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

This article focuses on the Tobas Indians who belong to a large group of indigenous people known as the ¿guaycurues¿. Originally, the Tobas occupied an extensive part of northern Argentina in the Chaco area, which includes the provinces of Chaco, Santa Fe, Santiago del Estero, Salta, and Formosa, reaching as far as neighboring Paraguay. The Tobas were a nomadic group who lived by hunting, fishing, and gathering. They later adopted some Andean cultural traditions such as ceramics, weaving, and basket making. However, over the years of continuing development, devastation plagued the community and migration became the only option. Rosario became the preferred destination and now the Tobas are living in and around the city. Rubbish provides these people with food, clothes, shoes, and a regular income. Aggravating their poor situation is the difficulty in obtaining social welfare assistance from the government because of political and religious factors. In order for the Tobas to develop in their new urban environment, various specialists are needed to tap the potential of this group to take the initiative to be productive in their own small ways.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times