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New potentially antihypertensive peptides liberated in milk during fermentation with selected lactic acid bacteria and kombucha cultures.

Authors
  • Elkhtab, Ebrahim1
  • El-Alfy, Mohamed2
  • Shenana, Mohamed2
  • Mohamed, Abdelaty2
  • Yousef, Ahmed E3
  • 1 Department of Food Science and Technology, The Ohio State University, Columbus 43210; Department of Dairy Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Benha University, Moshtohor, Qalyubia 13736, Egypt. , (Egypt)
  • 2 Department of Dairy Science, Faculty of Agriculture, Benha University, Moshtohor, Qalyubia 13736, Egypt. , (Egypt)
  • 3 Department of Food Science and Technology, The Ohio State University, Columbus 43210. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Dairy Science
Publisher
American Dairy Science Association
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2017
Volume
100
Issue
12
Pages
9508–9520
Identifiers
DOI: 10.3168/jds.2017-13150
PMID: 28964516
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Compounds with the ability to inhibit angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) are used medically to treat human hypertension. The presence of such compounds naturally in food is potentially useful for treating the disease state. The goal of this study was to screen lactic acid bacteria, including species commonly used as dairy starter cultures, for the ability to produce new potent ACE-inhibiting peptides during milk fermentation. Strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus casei, Lactobacillus delbrueckii ssp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus paracasei, Lactococcus lactis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, and Pediococcus acidilactici were tested in this study. Additionally, a symbiotic consortium of yeast and bacteria, used commercially to produce kombucha tea, was tested. Commercially sterile milk was inoculated with lactic acid bacteria strains and kombucha culture and incubated at 37°C for up to 72 h, and the liberation of ACE-inhibiting compounds during fermentation was monitored. Fermented milk was centrifuged and the supernatant (crude extract) was subjected to ultrafiltration using 3- and 10-kDa cut-off filters. Crude and ultrafiltered extracts were tested for ACE-inhibitory activity. The 10-kDa filtrate resulting from L. casei ATCC 7469 and kombucha culture fermentations (72 h) showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity. Two-step purification of these filtrates was done using HPLC equipped with a reverse-phase column. Analysis of HPLC-purified fractions by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry identified several new peptides with potent ACE-inhibitory activities. Some of these peptides were synthesized, and their ACE-inhibitory activities were confirmed. Use of organisms producing these unique peptides in food fermentations could contribute positively to human health.

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