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New miniplate for osteosynthesis of mandibular angle fractures designed to improve formation of new bone.

Authors
  • Pituru, Teodora Silagieva1
  • Bucur, Alexandru2
  • Gudas, Claudiu3
  • Pituru, Silviu-Mirel4
  • Marius Dinca, Octavian2
  • 1 Medical Department of Oro-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Carol Davila", Bucharest, Romania. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Oman)
  • 2 Medical Department of Oro-Maxillo-Facial Surgery, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Carol Davila", Bucharest, Romania. , (Oman)
  • 3 C&D Gudas, Sydney, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Professional Organization in Medical and Dental Legislation, University of Medicine and Pharmacy "Carol Davila", Bucharest, Romania. , (Oman)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of cranio-maxillo-facial surgery : official publication of the European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2016
Volume
44
Issue
4
Pages
500–505
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcms.2016.01.002
PMID: 26888464
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to present the study of a new miniplate designed to keep the maximum strains developed in the cortical bone near the fracture line during accidental biting to values below the threshold causing bone resorption. Designed to offer maximum fracture stability with minimal implanted volume and patient intrusion, the design uses a novel approach to account for the effects of the distance from the fracture line to the nearest screws. Its geometry minimizes the peak forces that can develop during most cases of mandible biomechanical loadings. A three-dimensional (3D) osteosynthesis finite element model for a human mandible confirmed the operational effectiveness of the miniplate. It also provided numerical estimates for the strains and screw forces in the cortical surface during incisor bites with clinically relevant forces of 200 N. Two prototypes, 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm in thickness, were repeatedly tested on fractured sheep mandibles, fixed in a purpose-built jig, to loads up to 150% of the maximum forces developed by human patients. The tests indicated good fracture stability, and the proof tests carried for each of the two prototypes terminated at more than 350 N due to failure of the loading cable and respectively, secondary mandible fractures occurring away from the miniplate.

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