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New free energy density functional and application to core-softened fluid.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
The Journal of Chemical Physics
0021-9606
Publisher
American Institute of Physics
Publication Date
Volume
132
Issue
19
Pages
194112–194112
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1063/1.3435206
PMID: 20499956
Source
Medline

Abstract

A new free energy density functional is advanced for general nonhard sphere potentials characterized by a repulsive core with a singular point at zero separation. The present functional is characterized by several features. (i) It does not involve with dividing the potentials into hard-sphere-like contribution and tail contribution in sharp contrast with usual effective hard sphere model+mean field approximation for tail contribution. (ii) It has no recourse to the use of weighted density and is computationally modest; it also does not resort to an equation of state and/or an excess Helmholtz free energy of bulk fluid over a range of density as input. Consequently, all of input information can be obtained by numerical solution of a bulk Ornstein-Zernike integral equation theory (OZ IET). Correspondingly, despite the use of bulk second-order direct correlation function (DCF) as input, the functional is applicable to the subcritical region. (iii) There is no any adjustable parameter associated with the present functional, and an effective hard sphere diameter entering the functional can be determined self-consistently and analytically once the input information, i.e., the second-order DCF and pressure of the coexistence bulk fluid, are obtained by the OZ IET. The present functional is applied to a core-softened fluid subject to varying external fields, and the density distributions predicted by the present functional are more self-consistent with available simulation results than a previous third-order+second-order perturbation density functional theory.

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