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A new cable-tie-based sternal closure device: infectious considerations.

Authors
  • Melly, Ludovic1
  • Gahl, Brigitta
  • Meinke, Ruth
  • Rueter, Florian
  • Matt, Peter
  • Reuthebuch, Oliver
  • Eckstein, Friedrich S
  • Grapow, Martin T R
  • 1 Clinic for Cardiac Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Basel, Switzerland. [email protected] , (Switzerland)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Interactive Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery
Publisher
Oxford University Press
Publication Date
Aug 01, 2013
Volume
17
Issue
2
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1093/icvts/ivt183
PMID: 23624983
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To determine the difference in sternal infection and other infectious events between conventional wire and cable-tie-based closure techniques post-sternotomy in a collective of patients after cardiac surgery. The sternal ZipFix™ (ZF) system consists of a biocompatible poly-ether-ether-ketone (PEEK) cable-tie that surrounds the sternum through the intercostal space and provides a large implant-to-bone contact. Between 1 February 2011 and 31 January 2012, 680 cardiac operations were performed via sternotomy at our institution. After the exclusion of operations for active endocarditis and early mortality within 7 days, 95 patients were exclusively closed with ZF and could be compared with 498 who were closed with conventional wires (CWs) during the same period. A multivariable logistic regression analysis, including body mass index, renal impairment and emergency as suspected confounders and inverse propensity weights was performed on the infection rate. Total infection rate was 6.1%, with a total of 36 diagnosed sternal infections (5 in ZF and 31 in CW). Comparing ZF with CW with regard to sternal infection, there is no statistically significant difference related to the device (odds ratio: 0.067, confidence interval: 0.04-9.16, P=0.72). The propensity modelling provided excellent overlap and the mean propensity was almost the same in both groups. Thus, we have observed no difference in receiving either ZF or CW. No sternal instability was observed with the ZF device, unlike 4/31 patients in the CW group. The overall operation time is reduced by 11 min in the ZF group with identical perfusion and clamping times. Our study underlines a neutral effect of the sternal ZipFix™ system in patients regarding sternal infection. Postoperative complications are similar in both sternal closure methods. The cable-tie-based system is fast, easy to use, reliable and safe.

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