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Neuropsychological deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease in the very-old: discrepancies in raw vs. standardized scores.

Authors
  • Bondi, Mark W
  • Houston, Wes S
  • Salmon, David P
  • Corey-Bloom, Jody
  • Katzman, Robert
  • Thal, Leon J
  • Delis, Dean C
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society : JINS
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2003
Volume
9
Issue
5
Pages
783–795
Identifiers
PMID: 12901784
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The profiles of neuropsychological deficits associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) in Young-Old (M age and 70) and Very-Old (M age > 80) patients were compared, along with possible modifying effects of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on these profiles. A comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests was administered to the two AD patient groups (Young-Old: n = 33; Very-Old: n = 48) and their respective age-matched normal control (NC) groups who remained free of dementia on follow-up examinations over a 1 to 10 year period (Young-Old: n = 43; Very-Old: n = 36). AD and NC groups did not differ in education levels or gender distributions. Young-Old AD and Very-Old AD groups were comparable in education, gender, dementia severity, and disease duration. Results showed that both AD groups achieved comparable raw scores on all the neuropsychological measures. However, when scores were standardized on the basis of performance of their respective NC groups (i.e., age-corrected z scores), Very-Old AD patients significantly outperformed Young-Old AD patients on tests of executive functions, visuospatial skills, and delayed memory. Furthermore, the relationship between age and memory and executive function deficits in AD was modified by APOE genotype. These data suggest that the profile of neuropsychological deficits associated with AD in the Very-Old lacks the disproportionate saliency of episodic memory and executive function deficits typical of the Young-Old.

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