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Neurophysiology. Decoding motor imagery from the posterior parietal cortex of a tetraplegic human.

Authors
  • Aflalo, Tyson1
  • Kellis, Spencer1
  • Klaes, Christian1
  • Lee, Brian2
  • Shi, Ying1
  • Pejsa, Kelsie1
  • Shanfield, Kathleen3
  • Hayes-Jackson, Stephanie3
  • Aisen, Mindy3
  • Heck, Christi2
  • Liu, Charles2
  • Andersen, Richard A4
  • 1 Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA.
  • 2 USC Neurorestoration Center and the Departments of Neurosurgery and Neurology, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033, USA.
  • 3 Rancho Los Amigos National Rehabilitation Center, Downey, CA 90242, USA.
  • 4 Division of Biology and Biological Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Science
Publisher
American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
Publication Date
May 22, 2015
Volume
348
Issue
6237
Pages
906–910
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1126/science.aaa5417
PMID: 25999506
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Nonhuman primate and human studies have suggested that populations of neurons in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) may represent high-level aspects of action planning that can be used to control external devices as part of a brain-machine interface. However, there is no direct neuron-recording evidence that human PPC is involved in action planning, and the suitability of these signals for neuroprosthetic control has not been tested. We recorded neural population activity with arrays of microelectrodes implanted in the PPC of a tetraplegic subject. Motor imagery could be decoded from these neural populations, including imagined goals, trajectories, and types of movement. These findings indicate that the PPC of humans represents high-level, cognitive aspects of action and that the PPC can be a rich source for cognitive control signals for neural prosthetics that assist paralyzed patients.

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