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Neuronal fate acquisition and specification: time for a change.

Authors
  • Bonnefont, Jérôme1
  • Vanderhaeghen, Pierre2
  • 1 Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Institut de Recherches en Biologie Humaine et Moléculaire (IRIBHM), and ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), 1070 Brussels, Belgium; VIB-KULeuven Center for Brain & Disease Research, KULeuven Department of Neurosciences, Leuven Brain Institute, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Belgium)
  • 2 Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Institut de Recherches en Biologie Humaine et Moléculaire (IRIBHM), and ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), 1070 Brussels, Belgium; VIB-KULeuven Center for Brain & Disease Research, KULeuven Department of Neurosciences, Leuven Brain Institute, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Belgium)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Current opinion in neurobiology
Publication Date
Feb 01, 2021
Volume
66
Pages
195–204
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.conb.2020.12.006
PMID: 33412482
Source
Medline
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

During embryonic development, neural stem/progenitor cells generate hundreds of different cell types through the combination of intrinsic and extrinsic cues. Recent data obtained in mouse and human cortical neurogenesis provide novel views about this interplay and how it evolves with time, whether during irreversible cell fate transitions that neural stem cells undergo to become neurons, or through gradual temporal changes of competence that lead to increased neuronal diversity from a common stem cell pool. In each case the temporal changes result from a dynamic balance between intracellular states and extracellular signalling factors. The underlying mechanisms are mostly conserved across species, but some display unique features in human corticogenesis, thereby linking temporal features of neurogenesis and human brain evolution. Copyright © 2020 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

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