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Neuronal Activity of Pallidal Versus Cerebellar Receiving Thalamus in Patients with Cervical Dystonia.

Authors
  • Semenova, U1
  • Medvednik, R1
  • Popov, V1, 2
  • Jinnah, H A3
  • Shaikh, A G4, 5, 6
  • Sedov, Alexey7, 8
  • 1 Laboratory of human cell neurophysiology, Semenov Federal Research Center for Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosigina str., 4, Moscow, 119991, Russia.
  • 2 N. N. Burdenko National Medical Research Center of Neurosurgery, Moscow, Russia.
  • 3 Departments of Neurology and Human Genetics, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
  • 4 Neurological Institute, University Hospitals, Cleveland, OH, USA.
  • 5 Neurology Service, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, OH, USA.
  • 6 Department of Neurology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USA.
  • 7 Laboratory of human cell neurophysiology, Semenov Federal Research Center for Chemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosigina str., 4, Moscow, 119991, Russia. [email protected]
  • 8 Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region, Russia. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cerebellum (London, England)
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
20
Issue
2
Pages
151–159
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s12311-020-01194-8
PMID: 33009654
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Cervical dystonia (CD) is a movement disorder characterized by a stereotyped pattern of involuntary turning or tilting of the head, often combined with jerky or tremulous movements. Hypotheses for the origin of CD have traditionally focused on the basal ganglia, but the contemporary discussion has considered the potential role of altered cerebellar function. As basal ganglia and the cerebellum largely project to the different thalamic nuclei, alterations in pallidal versus cerebellar output could be reflected in the activity of these thalamic regions. In this study, we analyzed a unique historic database where the single-unit activity of pallidal and cerebellar receiving thalamic nuclei was measured en route to the mesencephalon. We compared the single-unit activity of pallidal and cerebellar receiving thalamic neurons in three groups of CD patients manifesting as pure dystonia, pure jerky head oscillations, and dystonia plus jerky head oscillations. We found that among different CD manifestations, the characteristics of neuronal firing, such as burst versus a single-spike pattern, vary in cerebellar thalamic receiving nuclei. The cerebellar receiving region in patients with jerky oscillations had single-spikes neurons primarily. Wherein the manifestation of CD did not influence pattern distribution in the pallidal receiving thalamic area. We also found increased neuronal firing rate correlated with strength of theta-band neuronal oscillations during muscle contractions associated with dystonia. These results demonstrate that the manifestations of CD, such as pure dystonia, pure jerky head oscillations, or dystonia and jerky head oscillations, determine the thalamic neuronal properties.

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