Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Neurologic amebiasis caused by Balamuthia mandrillaris in an Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus).

Authors
  • Crossland, Nicholas A1
  • Ali, Ibne2
  • Higbie, Christine2
  • Jackson, Jonathan2
  • Pirie, Gordon2
  • Bauer, Rudy2
  • 1 Departments of Pathobiological Sciences (Crossland, Bauer), School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LAVeterinary Clinical Sciences (Higbie), School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LALouisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (Bauer)National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (Ali, Jackson)Baton Rouge Zoo, Baton Rouge, LA (Pirie) [email protected]
  • 2 Departments of Pathobiological Sciences (Crossland, Bauer), School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LAVeterinary Clinical Sciences (Higbie), School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LALouisiana Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA (Bauer)National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (Ali, Jackson)Baton Rouge Zoo, Baton Rouge, LA (Pirie).
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of veterinary diagnostic investigation : official publication of the American Association of Veterinary Laboratory Diagnosticians, Inc
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2016
Volume
28
Issue
1
Pages
54–58
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1177/1040638715614346
PMID: 26762405
Source
Medline
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

A 4-5-month-old intact male Indian flying fox (Pteropus giganteus) was presented to the Baton Rouge Zoo's veterinary hospital with an acute onset of obtundation that was diagnosed with amebic encephalitis. Histologic examination revealed numerous amebic trophozoites within necrotic foci, affecting the occipital cerebrum and surrounding the mesencephalic aqueduct. The etiologic agent, Balamuthia mandrillaris, was determined by multiplex quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and indirect fluorescent antibody test. The current report documented a case of amebic encephalitis within the order Chiroptera.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times