Affordable Access

deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

The neurobiology of human aggressive behavior: Neuroimaging, genetic, and neurochemical aspects.

Authors
  • Cupaioli, Francesca A1
  • Zucca, Fabio A1
  • Caporale, Cinzia2
  • Lesch, Klaus-Peter3
  • Passamonti, Luca4
  • Zecca, Luigi5
  • 1 Institute of Biomedical Technologies, National Research Council of Italy, Segrate (Milan), Italy. , (Italy)
  • 2 Institute of Biomedical Technologies, National Research Council of Italy, Unit of Rome, Rome, Italy. , (Italy)
  • 3 Division of Molecular Psychiatry, Center of Mental Health, University of Würzburg, Würzburg, Germany. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Germany)
  • 4 Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; Institute of Bioimaging and Molecular Physiology, National Research Council of Italy, Segrate (Milan), Italy; IRCCS San Camillo Hospital, Venice, Italy. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Italy)
  • 5 Institute of Biomedical Technologies, National Research Council of Italy, Segrate (Milan), Italy. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Italy)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry
Publication Date
Aug 19, 2020
Pages
110059–110059
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.pnpbp.2020.110059
PMID: 32822763
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

In modern societies, there is a strive to improve the quality of life related to risk of crimes which inevitably requires a better understanding of brain determinants and mediators of aggression. Neurobiology provides powerful tools to achieve this end. Pre-clinical and clinical studies show that changes in regional volumes, metabolism-function and connectivity within specific neural networks are related to aggression. Subregions of prefrontal cortex, insula, amygdala, basal ganglia and hippocampus play a major role within these circuits and have been consistently implicated in biology of aggression. Genetic variations in proteins regulating the synthesis, degradation, and transport of serotonin and dopamine as well as their signal transduction have been found to mediate behavioral variability observed in aggression. Gene-gene and gene-environment interactions represent additional important risk factors for aggressiveness. Considering the social burden of pathological forms of aggression, more basic and translational studies should be conducted to accelerate applications to clinical practice, justice courts, and policy making. Copyright © 2020 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times