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Neural gain induced by startling acoustic stimuli is additive to preparatory activation.

Authors
  • McInnes, Aaron N1
  • Corti, Emily J1
  • Tresilian, James R2
  • Lipp, Ottmar V1
  • Marinovic, Welber1
  • 1 School of Psychology, Curtin University, Bentley, Western Australia, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Department of Psychology, University of Warwick, Coventry, UK.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Psychophysiology
Publication Date
Oct 09, 2019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/psyp.13493
PMID: 31595983
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Loud acoustic stimuli presented during movement preparation can shorten reaction time and increase response forcefulness. We examined how efferent connectivity of an agonist muscle to reticulospinal and corticospinal pathways, and the level of prepared movement force, affect reaction time and movement execution when the motor response is triggered by an intense acoustic stimulus. In Experiment 1, participants executed ballistic wrist flexion and extension movements of low and high force in response to visual stimuli. A loud acoustic stimulus (LAS; 105 dBa) was presented simultaneously with the visual imperative stimulus in probe trials. In Experiment 2, participants executed ballistic wrist flexion movements ranging from 10%-50% of maximum voluntary contraction with a LAS presented in probe trials. The shortening of response initiation was not affected by movement type (flexion or extension) or prepared movement force. Enhancement of response magnitude, however, was proportionally greater for low force movements and for the flexor muscle. Changes in peak force induced by the intense acoustic stimulus indicated that the neural activity introduced to motor program circuits by acoustic stimulation is additive to the voluntary neural activity that occurs due to movement preparation, rather than multiplicative. © 2019 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

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