Affordable Access

Neural correlates of the precedence effect in the inferior colliculus of behaving cats.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of neurophysiology
Publication Date
Volume
92
Issue
6
Pages
3286–3297
Identifiers
PMID: 15295015
Source
Medline

Abstract

Several auditory spatial illusions, collectively called the precedence effect (PE), occur when transient sounds are presented from two different spatial locations but separated in time by an interstimulus delay (ISD). For ISDs in the range of localization dominance (<10 ms), a single fused sound is typically located near the leading source location only, as if the location of the lagging source were suppressed. For longer ISDs, both the leading and lagging sources can be heard and localized, and the shortest ISD where this occurs is called the echo threshold. Previous physiological studies of the extracellular responses of single neurons in the inferior colliculus (IC) of anesthetized cats and unanesthetized rabbits with sounds known to elicit the PE have shown correlates of these phenomena though there were differences in the physiologically measured echo thresholds. Here we recorded in the IC of awake, behaving cats using stimuli that we have shown to evoke behavioral responses that are consistent with the precedence effect. For small ISDs, responses to the lag were reduced or eliminated consistent with psychophysical data showing that sound localization is based on the leading source. At longer ISDs, the responses to the lagging source recovered at ISDs comparable to psychophysically measured echo thresholds. Thus it appears that anesthesia, and not species differences, accounts for the discrepancies in the earlier studies.

There are no comments yet on this publication. Be the first to share your thoughts.

Statistics

Seen <100 times
0 Comments