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National trends in inpatient parotidectomy: A fourteen-year retrospective analysis.

Authors
  • Sethi, Rosh K V1
  • Deschler, Daniel G2
  • 1 Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston, MA, United States. Electronic address: [email protected] , (United States)
  • 2 Department of Otolaryngology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States; Department of Otolaryngology, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Boston, MA, United States. , (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
American journal of otolaryngology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2018
Volume
39
Issue
5
Pages
553–557
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.amjoto.2018.06.010
PMID: 29907428
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Operating room (OR) procedures represent one quarter of hospitalizations, yet OR-related stays account for nearly 50% of hospital costs. Understanding trends in inpatient parotidectomy, associated charges, and key outcomes including length of stay is imperative in the era of evolving health reform. The Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) was queried for patients who underwent inpatient parotidectomy (ICD9-CM procedure code 26.31 and 26.32) between 2001 and 2014. Patient demographics, co-morbidities, hospital characteristics and outcomes including length of stay (LOS) and hospital charges were assessed. A total of 66,914 parotidectomies were performed in the inpatient setting between 2001 and 2014. The volume of inpatient parotidectomy decreased steadily by 48% over the study period (7375 procedures in 2001 to 3530 procedures in 2014). Average LOS increased from 1.8 days in 2001 to 2.5 days in 2014. Total charges increased from $17,072 in 2001 to $55,929 in 2014. In 2014, the majority of inpatient parotidectomies were performed in a teaching hospital (87%) and among patients who were older than 65 years (48.1%). In 2001, only 35.4% of patients who underwent parotidectomy were older than age 65, and relatively fewer surgeries were performed at teaching hospitals (63.1%). Inpatient parotidectomy in the United States has evolved over the past fourteen years. Notable trends include a nearly 50% reduction of inpatient surgery, doubling in LOS, tripling of hospital charges and predominance of elderly patients with malignant disease. These results provide insight into inpatient parotid lesion management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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