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A National Perspective on the Current Educational Environment in Pediatric Community-Based Continuity Clinic.

Authors
  • Ben-Zion, Sabrina1
  • Ramundo, Maria2
  • McNinch, Neil L2
  • Abramson, Erika3
  • 1 Akron Children's Hospital (S Ben-Zion, M Ramundo, NL McNinch), Akron, OH. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Akron Children's Hospital (S Ben-Zion, M Ramundo, NL McNinch), Akron, OH.
  • 3 Weill Cornell (E Abramson), New York, NY.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Academic pediatrics
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
21
Issue
3
Pages
391–395
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.acap.2020.08.007
PMID: 32835894
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To characterize current practices of US pediatric residency programs around use of community-based continuity clinics for residency training. A national, anonymous survey was sent electronically to all US pediatric program directors (PDs) through the Association of Pediatric Program Directors (APPD). The survey assessed preceptor recruitment, faculty development, teaching methods, and PDs' satisfaction with the experience and teaching at community sites. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi2 Test of Independence. A total of 99 of 200 (50%) programs responded. Fifty-six percent (55/99) did not sent any residents into the community. Of the remaining 44 programs, 48% had difficulty recruiting preceptors. Only 34% require preceptors to engage in faculty development around teaching and less than half require community preceptors to work through a formal curriculum. Almost all PDs that sent residents to community-based practices were very to extremely satisfied with resident experiences (84%), but 37% were not satisfied with residents having their own patient panel. While the majority of PD's were satisfied with resident experiences in community-based sites, recruitment was challenging, and teaching and faculty development methods varied. Determining incentives to help recruitment, ensuring use of a formal primary care curriculum and providing faculty development around teaching, will be critical for training. Copyright © 2020 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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