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National Basketball Association combine performance after a partial meniscectomy.

Authors
  • Khalil, L S1
  • Mehran, N2
  • Toor, A3
  • Matar, R N4
  • Kharrazi, F D3
  • 1 Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 W. Grand Blvd, Detroit, MI, 48202, USA. [email protected]
  • 2 Kaiser Permanente Sunset Medical Center, 4867 Sunset Blvd, Los Angeles, CA, 90027, USA.
  • 3 Kerlan Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic, 6801 Park Ter #400, Los Angeles, CA, 90045, USA.
  • 4 College of Medicine, Central Michigan University, 1280 East Campus Drive, Mount Pleasant, MI, 48859, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Musculoskeletal surgery
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2021
Volume
105
Issue
1
Pages
105–110
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s12306-020-00636-0
PMID: 31989533
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

An arthroscopic meniscectomy is one of the most common orthopedic procedures in athletes. Return to play rates and deficits in muscle function have been reviewed after meniscectomy, but no study has reviewed functional performance after an isolated partial meniscectomy. To compare the performance of elite-level basketball players after a partial meniscectomy to a control group of players with no previous reported knee injury. We believe that there is no difference between the two groups in functional performance. Case Series. Functional performance results from the National Basketball Association (NBA) combine were reviewed between 2000 and 2015. Twelve out of 1092 players were found to have undergone a partial meniscectomy prior to competing in the NBA combine. The partial meniscectomy group was compared to an age-, size-, and position-matched control group with respect to functional performance testing such as the shuttle run test, lane agility test, ¾ court sprint, vertical jump (no step), and vertical jump (max). The meniscectomy and the control groups that there was no significant difference between the two groups in agility, quickness, sprinting, and jumping ability. However, there was a - 0.596 spearman correlation between months after surgery and agility (p = 0.041), while there was a + 0.690 and + 0.650 spearman correlation between both months after surgery and standing vertical and max vertical (p = 0.013 and p = 0.022). Athletes competing in the NBA combine who have undergone a partial meniscectomy perform as well as uninjured athletes in all NBA combine performance testing. Furthermore, as athletes are further out from surgery, they have an improvement in both standing and max vertical jump.

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