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Narrative care: Unpacking pandemic paradoxes.

Authors
  • Caine, Vera1
  • Steeves, Pamela2
  • Berendonk, Charlotte1
  • Blix, Bodil H3
  • Jean Clandinin, D2
  • 1 Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 2 Centre for Research for Teacher Education and Development, Faculty of Education, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. , (Canada)
  • 3 Department of Health and Care Sciences, UiT The Arctic University of Norway, Tromso, Norway. , (Norway)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nursing Inquiry
Publisher
Wiley (Blackwell Publishing)
Publication Date
Jul 01, 2022
Volume
29
Issue
3
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/nin.12462
PMID: 34541743
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

During the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, public health has issued three interrelated dominant narratives through social media and news outlets: First, to care for others, we must keep physically distant; second, we live in the same world and experience the same pandemic; and third, we will return to normal at some point. These narratives create complexities as they collide with the authors' everyday lives as nurses, educators, and women. This collision creates three paradoxes for us: (a) learning to care by creating physical distance, (b) a sense of togetherness erases inequities, and (c) returning to normal is possible. To inquire into these three paradoxes, we draw on our experiences with Ingrid, an older adult who requires in-home physical care, and Matthew, a man with multiple disabilities including severe oral dyspraxia and developmental delays. We outline how narrative care is a counterstory to the dominant narratives and enables us to find ways to live our lives within the paradoxes. Narrative care allows us, through attention to embodiment, liminality, and imagination, to create forward looking stories. Understanding narrative care within these paradoxes allows us to offer more complex understandings of the ways narrative care can be embodied in our, and others', lives. © 2021 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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