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Nanostructured gold electrodes promote neural maturation and network connectivity.

Authors
  • Domínguez-Bajo, Ana1
  • Rosa, Juliana M2
  • González-Mayorga, Ankor2
  • Rodilla, Beatriz L3
  • Arché-Núñez, Ana4
  • Benayas, Esther1
  • Ocón, Pilar5
  • Pérez, Lucas3
  • Camarero, Julio6
  • Miranda, Rodolfo6
  • González, M Teresa4
  • Aguilar, Juan7
  • López-Dolado, Elisa7
  • Serrano, María C8
  • 1 Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), CSIC, Calle Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, 28049, Madrid, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 2 Hospital Nacional de Parapléjicos, SESCAM, Finca La Peraleda s/n, 45071, Toledo, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 3 Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA Nanociencia), Calle Faraday 9, 28049, Madrid, Spain; Departamento de Física de Materiales, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Plaza de las Ciencias s/n, 28040, Madrid, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 4 Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA Nanociencia), Calle Faraday 9, 28049, Madrid, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 5 Departamento de Química Física Aplicada, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049, Madrid, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 6 Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA Nanociencia), Calle Faraday 9, 28049, Madrid, Spain; Instituto "Nicolás Cabrera" and Condensed Matter Physics Center (IFIMAC), Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, 28049, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 7 Hospital Nacional de Parapléjicos, SESCAM, Finca La Peraleda s/n, 45071, Toledo, Spain; Research Unit of "Design and development of biomaterials for neural regeneration", Hospital Nacional de Parapléjicos, Joint Research Unit with CSIC, Finca La Peraleda s/n, 45071, Toledo, Spain. , (Spain)
  • 8 Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (ICMM), CSIC, Calle Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz 3, 28049, Madrid, Spain. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Spain)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biomaterials
Publication Date
Dec 01, 2021
Volume
279
Pages
121186–121186
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2021.121186
PMID: 34700221
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Progress in the clinical application of recording and stimulation devices for neural diseases is still limited, mainly because of suboptimal material engineering and unfavorable interactions with biological entities. Nanotechnology is providing upgraded designs of materials to better mimic the native extracellular environment and attain more intimate contacts with individual neurons, besides allowing for the miniaturization of the electrodes. However, little progress has been done to date on the understanding of the biological impact that such neural interfaces have on neural network maturation and functionality. In this work, we elucidate the effect of a gold (Au) highly ordered nanostructure on the morphological and functional interactions with neural cells and tissues. Alumina-templated Au nanostructured electrodes composed of parallel nanowires of 160 nm in diameter and 1.2 μm in length (Au-NWs), with 320 nm of pitch, are designed and characterized. Equivalent non-structured Au electrodes (Au-Flat) are used for comparison. By using diverse techniques in in vitro cell cultures including live calcium imaging, we found that Au-NWs interfaced with primary neural cortical cells for up to 14 days allow neural networks growth and increase spontaneous activity and ability of neuronal synchronization, thus indicating that nanostructured features favor neuronal network. The enhancement in the number of glial cells found is hypothesized to be behind these beneficial functional effects. The in vivo effect of the implantation of these nanostructured electrodes and its potential relevance for future clinical applicability has been explored in an experimental model of rat spinal cord injury. Subacute responses to implanted Au-NWs show no overt reactive or toxic biological reactions besides those triggered by the injury itself. These results highlight the translational potential of Au-NWs electrodes for in vivo applications as neural interfaces in contact with central nervous tissues including the injured spinal cord. Copyright © 2021 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

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