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Naloxone suppresses fluid consumption in tests of choice between sodium chloride solutions and water in male and female water-deprived rats.

Authors
  • Cooper, S J
  • Gilbert, D B
Type
Published Article
Journal
Psychopharmacology
Publication Date
Jan 01, 1984
Volume
84
Issue
3
Pages
362–367
Identifiers
PMID: 6440182
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

The effects of naloxone on fluid consumption by water-deprived rats trained to choose between a saline solution and water in a 15-min drinking test were examined. Rats of each sex were allocated to three groups and given access to 0.125% NaCl, 0.6% NaCl, and 1.7% NaCl, respectively, as the alternative to water. Under control conditions they drank substantially more of the hypotonic salt solutions than water, but drank slightly more water than hypertonic salt solution. Naloxone generally reduced fluid consumption, dose-dependently (0.01-10 mg/kg). In the cases of the two hypotonic solutions, the suppressant effect of naloxone was limited to saline solution. The usually low levels of water consumption were unaffected. In the case of the hypertonic solution, naloxone suppressed salt and water intakes by equivalent amounts. The effects of naloxone in the tests with the two higher salt concentrations depended upon sex. There was on example of a significant naloxone-induced reduction in saline preference (females; 0.125% NaCl v H2O). In other instances, saline preferences were not significantly modified. The results are briefly discussed in relation to current suggestions that naloxone may affect fluid consumption in ways which are taste-dependent (e.g., taste sensitivity, palatability, reward). An alternative view is also considered, that the effects of naloxone may be taste-independent, at least in the particular case of drinking in a two-choice test with saline and water.

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