Affordable Access

N-Acetyltransferase phenotype and risk in urinary bladder cancer: approaches in molecular epidemiology. Preliminary results in Sweden and Denmark

Authors
Publication Date
Source
PMC
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Biology
License
Unknown

Abstract

A variable but often significant proportion of urinary bladder cancer in urban areas can be attributed to occupational and cultural (cigarette smoking) situations associated with exposures to various arylamines. The variable N-acetylation of carcinogenic arylamines by human hepatic enzyme systems, the known genetic regulation and polymorphic distribution of this enzyme activity in humans, and the known enhanced susceptibility of individuals with the genetically-distinct “slow acetylator” phenotype to various arylamine toxicities, has prompted examination of possible correlations between N-acetyltransferase phenotype and urinary bladder cancer risk in rural and urban populations. In this context, N-acetylation is viewed as a component of detoxication pathways with respect to arylamine bladder carcinogenesis.

Statistics

Seen <100 times