Affordable Access

deepdyve-link deepdyve-link
Publisher Website

Myotubularin regulates Akt-dependent survival signaling via phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of Biological Chemistry
1083-351X
Publisher
American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Publication Date
Volume
286
Issue
22
Pages
20005–20019
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1074/jbc.M110.197749
PMID: 21478156
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Myotubularin is a 3-phosphoinositide phosphatase that is mutated in X-linked myotubular myopathy, a severe neonatal disorder in which skeletal muscle development and/or regeneration is impaired. In this report we provide evidence that siRNA-mediated silencing of myotubularin expression markedly inhibits growth factor-stimulated Akt phosphorylation, leading to activation of caspase-dependent pro-apoptotic signaling in HeLa cells and primary human skeletal muscle myotubes. Myotubularin silencing also inhibits Akt-dependent signaling through the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 as assessed by p70 S6-kinase and 4E-BP1 phosphorylation. Similarly, phosphorylation of FoxO transcription factors is also significantly reduced in myotubularin-deficient cells. Our data further suggest that inhibition of Akt activation and downstream survival signaling in myotubularin-deficient cells is caused by accumulation of the MTMR substrate lipid phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate generated from the type II phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase PIK3C2B. Our findings are significant because they suggest that myotubularin regulates Akt activation via a cellular pool of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate that is distinct from that generated by the type III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase hVps34. Because impaired Akt signaling has been tightly linked to skeletal muscle atrophy, we hypothesize that loss of Akt-dependent growth/survival cues due to impaired myotubularin function may be a critical factor underlying the severe skeletal muscle atrophy characteristic of muscle fibers in patients with X-linked myotubular myopathy.

Statistics

Seen <100 times