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Mutations in LACS2, a long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetase, enhance susceptibility to avirulent Pseudomonas syringae but confer resistance to Botrytis cinerea in Arabidopsis.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
PLANT PHYSIOLOGY
0032-0889
Publisher
American Society of Plant Biologists
Publication Date
Volume
144
Issue
2
Pages
1093–1103
Identifiers
PMID: 17434992
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

We identified an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, sma4 (symptoms to multiple avr genotypes4), that displays severe disease symptoms when inoculated with avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato, although bacterial growth is only moderately enhanced compared to wild-type plants. The sma4 mutant showed a normal susceptible phenotype to the biotrophic fungal pathogen Erysiphe cichoracearum. Significantly, the sma4 mutant was highly resistant to a necrotrophic fungal pathogen, Botrytis cinerea. Germination of B. cinerea spores on sma4 mutant leaves was inhibited, and penetration by those that did germinate was rare. The sma4 mutant also showed several pleiotropic phenotypes, including increased sensitivity to lower humidity and salt stress. Isolation of SMA4 by positional cloning revealed that it encodes LACS2, a member of the long-chain acyl-CoA synthetases. LACS2 has previously been shown to be involved in cutin biosynthesis. We therefore tested three additional cutin-defective mutants for resistance to B. cinerea: att1 (for aberrant induction of type three genes), bodyguard, and lacerata. All three displayed an enhanced resistance to B. cinerea. Our results indicate that plant cutin or cuticle structure may play a crucial role in tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress and in the pathogenesis of B. cinerea.

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