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Mutations in the catalytic domain of factor IX that are related to the subclass hemophilia Bm.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Biochemistry
Publication Date
Volume
32
Issue
25
Pages
6324–6329
Identifiers
PMID: 8518277
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Hemophilia Bm, a variant of hemophilia B, results in a marked increase in the ox brain prothrombin time. Mutations known to cause hemophilia Bm occur at residue 180, 181, or 182 near the amino terminus of the heavy chain and at residue 311, 364, 368, 390, 396, or 397 near the activation site of factor IX (Giannelli et al., 1990). In this study we replaced factor IX residues 181, 182, and 390 in separate experiments by site-directed mutgenesis. Valine 181 was replaced by isoleucine or alanine, and valine 182 was replaced by alanine or glycine. Alanine 390 was replaced by valine or aspartic acid. Recombinant factor IXs were expressed in human kidney 293 cells and purified by absorption and elution from a conformational specific monoclonal antibody column. The results show that factor IX Bm is a function not only of the position of the mutated amino acid but also of the particular amino acid substituted. For example, when valine 181 or 182 was replaced by small hydrophobic amino acids (alanine and glycine), factor IXs were found to have significantly decreased clotting activity. Unlike the naturally occurring mutations (Val181 --> Phe181 or Val182 --> Leu182), however, the small amino acid replacements did not result in prolonged ox brain prothrombin times. Surprisingly, the Ala390 --> Asp390 exchange did not affect clotting activity or binding to the macromolecular inhibitor antithrombin III. The Ala390 --> Val390 exchange resulted in loss of both clotting activity and binding to antithrombin III. These results suggest that residue 390 is not directly involved in binding to antithrombin III.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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