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Muscle-strengthening physical activity is associated with cancer mortality: results from the 1998–2011 National Health Interview Surveys, National Death Index record linkage

Authors
  • Siahpush, Mohamamd1
  • Farazi, Paraskevi A.2
  • Wang, Hongmei3
  • Robbins, Regina E.4
  • Singh, Gopal K.5
  • Su, Dejun1
  • 1 University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Health Promotion, College of Public Health, 984340 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE, 68198-4340, USA , Omaha (United States)
  • 2 University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, 984395 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, USA , Omaha (United States)
  • 3 University of Nebraska Medical Center, Department of Health Services Research and Administration, College of Public Health, 984395 Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, USA , Omaha (United States)
  • 4 University of Nebraska at Omaha, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, 6001 Dodge Street, Omaha, NE, 68182-0213, USA , Omaha (United States)
  • 5 Office of Health Equity, Health Resources and Services Administration, U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, Rockville, MD, 20857, USA , Rockville (United States)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cancer Causes & Control
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Apr 19, 2019
Volume
30
Issue
6
Pages
663–670
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10552-019-01169-z
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

PurposeTo examine the association of muscle-strengthening activities (MSA) and cancer mortality.MethodsWe pooled data from the 1998 to 2009 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which were linked to records in the National Death Index. Mortality follow-up was through 31 December 2011. Based on U.S. federal guidelines for physical activity, we dichotomized MSA and compared those who performed MSA twice a week or more to others with lower MSA. We also examined dose–response relationship of MSA frequency with cancer mortality. Hazard ratios (HR) from Cox regression were computed to estimate the association of MSA with the risk of cancer mortality. Mean follow-up was 7.9 years and the analysis sample size was 310,282.ResultsCovariate-adjusted results showed that meeting the MSA guideline was associated with a 19% lower risk of cancer mortality (HR 0.81, 95% CI 0.73, 0.90). We found no evidence of a dose–response relationship between the frequency of performing MSA and cancer mortality.ConclusionAdhering to the U.S. federal guideline for MSA is associated with lower cancer mortality. Public health programs and policy for cancer prevention and control should promote MSA to further reduce cancer mortality.

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