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Multiple acetylcholinesterases in Pardosa pseudoannulata brain worked collaboratively to provide protection from organophosphorus insecticides.

Authors
  • Lin, Xumin1
  • Zhang, Yixi1
  • Yang, Baojun2
  • Zhang, Lingchun1
  • Chen, Yunru1
  • Liu, Zewen3
  • 1 Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Crop Diseases and Pests (Ministry of Education), College of Plant Protection, Nanjing Agricultural University, Weigang 1, Nanjing 210095, China. , (China)
  • 2 Rice Technology Research and Development Center, China National Rice Research Institute, Stadium 359, Hangzhou 310006, China. , (China)
  • 3 Key Laboratory of Integrated Management of Crop Diseases and Pests (Ministry of Education), College of Plant Protection, Nanjing Agricultural University, Weigang 1, Nanjing 210095, China. Electronic address: [email protected]. , (China)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Dec 15, 2022
Volume
248
Pages
114301–114301
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.ecoenv.2022.114301
PMID: 36410143
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is an essential neurotransmitter hydrolase in nervous systems of animals and its number varies among species. So far, five AChEs have been identified in the natural enemy Pardosa pseudoannulata. Here we found that Ppace1, Ppace2 and Ppace5 were highly expressed in the spider brain, among which the mRNA level of Ppace5, but not Ppace1 and Ppace2, could be up-regulated by organophosphorus insecticides at their sublethal concentrations. In spider brain, the treatment by organophosphorus insecticides at the sublethal concentrations could increase total AChE activity, although high concentrations inhibited the activity. The activity that increased from the sublethal concentration pretreatment could compensate for the activity inhibition due to subsequent application of organophosphorus insecticides at lethal concentrations, and consequently reduce the mortality of spiders. PpAChE1 and PpAChE2 were highly sensitive to organophosphorus insecticides, and their activities would be strongly inhibited by the insecticides. In contrast, PpAChE5 displayed relative insensitivity towards organophosphorus insecticides, but with the highest catalytic efficiency for ACh. That meant the up-regulation of Ppace5 under insecticide exposure was important for maintaining AChE activity in spider brain, when PpAChE1 and PpAChE2 were inhibited by organophosphorus insecticides. The study demonstrated that multiple AChEs in the spider brain worked collaboratively, with part members for maintaining AChE activity and other members responding to organophosphorus inhibition, to provide protection from organophosphorus insecticides. In fields, high concentration insecticides are often applied when ineffective controls of insect pests occur due to relative-low concentration of insecticides in last round application. This application pattern of organophosphorus insecticides provides more chances for P. pseudoannulata to survive and controlling insect pests as a natural enemy. Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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