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Multilocus phylogenetic analyses reveal that habitat selection drives the speciation of Didymozoidae (Digenea) parasitizing Pacific and Atlantic bluefin tunas.

Authors
  • Mladineo, I1
  • Bott, N J
  • Nowak, B F
  • Block, B A
  • 1 Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, 120 Oceanview Blvd, Pacific Grove, CA 93950, USA. [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Parasitology
Publication Date
May 2010
Volume
137
Issue
6
Pages
1013–1025
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1017/S0031182009991703
PMID: 20028607
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Parasite communities of wild and reared bluefin tuna display remarkable diversity. Among these, the most prevalent and abundant are the Didymozoidae (Monticelli, 1888) (Trematoda, Digenea), considered one of the most taxonomically complex digenean families. The aim of this study was to evaluate phylogenetic structure of Didymozoidae occurring in Pacific (Thunnus orientalis) and Atlantic bluefin tuna (T. thynnus) in order to increase our knowledge of didymozoid zoogeography and identify species that could successfully be employed as biological tags for stock assessment studies. For the present analyses we used 2 nuclear ribosomal DNA loci, part of the 28S gene and the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS-2) as well as a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene (cox1). In most parasitic groups, morphology is the primary factor in the structuring of phylogenetic relationships. In rare examples, however, habitat has been suggested as a primary factor affecting parasite evolution. During their evolution, didymozoids have spread and inhabited a remarkable number of different sites in their hosts, colonizing exterior as well as strictly interior niches. Our data suggest that habitat selection has been the leading force in shaping didymozoid phylogenetic relationships. For 2 didymozoid species (D. wedli and D. palati), cox1 sequences indicate intraspecific differences between Mexican and Adriatic populations.

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