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Multidrug resistance transporter-1 and breast cancer resistance protein protect against ovarian toxicity, and are essential in ovarian physiology.

Authors
  • Brayboy, Lynae M1
  • Oulhen, Nathalie2
  • Long, Sokunvichet3
  • Voigt, Niesha4
  • Raker, Christina5
  • Wessel, Gary M6
  • 1 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility, Women & Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 101 Dudley Street, Providence, RI 02905, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
  • 2 Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA.
  • 3 Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA.
  • 4 Alpert Medical School of Brown University, USA.
  • 5 Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Women and Infants Hospital of Rhode Island, Providence, RI, USA.
  • 6 Department of Molecular Biology, Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912, USA. Electronic address: [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Reproductive toxicology (Elmsford, N.Y.)
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2017
Volume
69
Pages
121–131
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.reprotox.2017.02.002
PMID: 28216407
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Ovarian protection from chemotoxicity is essential for reproductive health. Our objective is to determine the role of ATP-dependent, Multidrug Resistance Transporters (MDRs) in this protection. Previously we identified MDR-dependent cytoprotection from cyclophosphamide in mouse and human oocytes by use of MDR inhibitors. Here we use genetic deletions in MDR1a/b/BCRP of mice to test MDR function in ovarian somatic cells and find that mdr1a/b/bcrp-/- mice had significantly increased sensitivity to cyclophosphamide. Further, estrus cyclicity and follicle distribution in mdr1a/b/bcrp-/- mice also differed from age-matched wildtype ovaries. We found that MDR gene activity cycles through estrus and that MDR-1b cyclicity correlated with 17β-estradiol surges. We also examined the metabolite composition of the ovary and learned that the mdr1a/b/bcrp-/- mice have increased accumulation of metabolites indicative of oxidative stress and inflammation. We conclude that MDRs are essential to ovarian protection from chemotoxicity and may have an important physiological role in the ovary. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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