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A Multidisciplinary, Community-Based Program to Reduce Unplanned Hospital Admissions.

Authors
  • Wan, Ching Shan1
  • Mitchell, Jade2
  • Maier, Andrea B3
  • 1 Department of Medicine and Aged Care, @AgeMelbourne, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 Department of Medicine and Community Care, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Department of Medicine and Aged Care, @AgeMelbourne, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; Department of Human Movement Sciences, @AgeAmsterdam, Faculty of Behavioural and Movement Sciences, Amsterdam Movement Sciences, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of the American Medical Directors Association
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2021
Volume
22
Issue
6
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.jamda.2020.09.034
PMID: 33162357
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

To evaluate the effect of Hospital Admission Risk Program (HARP) on unplanned hospitalization, bed days, and mortality of enrolled individuals and to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of HARP. A retrospective longitudinal analysis of hospital administrative data. Individuals at risk of hospitalization were provided with multidisciplinary, community-based care support managed by care coordinators including integrated care planning, education, monitoring, service linkages, and general practitioner liaison over 6-9 months. Individuals who were enrolled into 1 of 8 HARP chronic disease management programs between July 1, 2017, and June 30, 2018, at the Royal Melbourne Hospital, Australia. Hospital admissions between 18 months before and 18 months after HARP enrollment were analyzed. Total hospital costs were compared between 18 months before and 12 months after HARP enrollment. A total of 1553 individuals with a median age of 71 years (interquartile range 60-81), 63.4% males, were admitted to HARP. Both unplanned hospitalizations and bed days were reduced during the HARP intervention compared to within 3 months before enrollment in each of the HARP management programs. After the HARP intervention, cardiac coach, cardiac heart failure, chronic respiratory, diabetes comanagement, and medication management programs had higher hospitalizations and bed days than individuals' baseline of at least 3 months before HARP enrollment. Individuals in cardiac heart failure and chronic respiratory management programs had a higher mortality rate than other HARP chronic disease management programs. Individuals in cardiac coach, diabetes comanagement, and medication management programs had lower hospital costs during the HARP intervention compared to within 3 months before HARP enrollment. HARP reduced unplanned hospitalization and bed days but did not return individuals' hospital use to baseline before the intervention. The variations in mortality between HARP chronic disease management programs implies that condition-specific goals between programs is preferable. Copyright © 2020 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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