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Mukbang- and Cookbang-watching status and dietary life of university students who are not food and nutrition majors.

Authors
  • Yun, Sowon1
  • Kang, Hyunjoo2
  • Lee, Hongmie1, 3
  • 1 Graduate School of Education, Daejin University, Pocheon 11159, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 2 Department of Food & Nutrition, Bucheon University, Bucheon 14632, Korea. , (North Korea)
  • 3 Department of Food Science & Nutrition, Daejin University, Pocheon 11159, Korea. , (North Korea)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Nutrition research and practice
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2020
Volume
14
Issue
3
Pages
276–285
Identifiers
DOI: 10.4162/nrp.2020.14.3.276
PMID: 32528634
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

As watching food-related programs has become very popular among the young generation in Korea, this study sought to compare the Mukbang- and Cookbang-watching status of university students with their dietary life. The participants were 380 students who were not majoring in food and nutrition at a university in Gyeonggi, Korea. Based on self- reports, the participants were grouped according to their frequency of watching Mukbang or Cookbang: frequent-watching (FW) 21.1% and 5.3%, respectively; moderate-watching (MW) 43.9% and 27.9%, respectively; and not-watching (NW) 35.0% and 66.8% respectively. In the FW group, up to 88.8% and 70.0% of participants reported watching Mukbang and Cookbang, respectively, ≥ 3 days/week. Almost all participants in the FW and MW groups reported intention to keep watching these shows. The most frequent watching route was "YouTube" and the most important criterion to select a program was "food". In the case of Mukbang, but not Cookbang, the participants in the FW group scored their diet significantly worse than those in the NW group (P < 0.05). A greater proportion of participants felt that watching Cookbang improved their diets rather than worsened them (14.3% vs. 0.8%, respectively), while more participants said that watching Mukbang worsened their diets rather than improved them (8.1% vs. 2.4%, respectively). In both cases, greater differences were shown in the FW groups compared to the MW groups (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01 for Cookbang and Mukbang, respectively). Moreover, the participants answered that Mukbang-watching prompted them to eat more of less desirable food, such as through eating out and purchasing convenient and delivered foods, whereas Cookbang-watching made them want to cook more of their own food. Our results suggested that Korean university students who frequently watch Mukbang, but not Cookbang, may be a nutritionally vulnerable group that needs attention. ©2020 The Korean Nutrition Society and the Korean Society of Community Nutrition.

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