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Movement syndromes of a Neotropical frugivorous bat inhabiting heterogeneous landscapes in Brazil

Authors
  • Kerches-Rogeri, Patricia1
  • Ramos, Danielle Leal1
  • Siren, Jukka2, 3
  • de Oliveira Teles, Beatriz1
  • Alves, Rafael Souza Cruz1
  • Priante, Camila Fátima1
  • Ribeiro, Milton Cezar1
  • Araújo, Márcio Silva1
  • Ovaskainen, Otso2, 4
  • 1 Universidade Estadual Paulista – UNESP, Avenida 24 A,1515, Rio Claro, São Paulo, Brazil , São Paulo (Brazil)
  • 2 University of Helsinki, Viikinkaari 1, Helsinki, 00014, Finland , Helsinki (Finland)
  • 3 Aalto University, Espoo, Finland , Espoo (Finland)
  • 4 Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, N-7491, Norway , Trondheim (Norway)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Movement Ecology
Publisher
BioMed Central
Publication Date
Jul 07, 2021
Volume
9
Issue
1
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1186/s40462-021-00266-6
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
Disciplines
  • Research
License
Green

Abstract

BackgroundThere is growing evidence that individuals within populations can vary in both habitat use and movement behavior, but it is still not clear how these two relate to each other. The aim of this study was to test if and how individual bats in a Stunira lilium population differ in their movement activity and preferences for landscape features in a correlated manner.MethodsWe collected data on movements of 27 individuals using radio telemetry. We fitted a heterogeneous-space diffusion model to the movement data in order to evaluate signals of movement variation among individuals.ResultsS. lilium individuals generally preferred open habitat with Solanum fruits, regularly switched between forest and open areas, and showed high site fidelity. Movement variation among individuals could be summarized in four movement syndromes: (1) average individuals, (2) forest specialists, (3) explorers which prefer Piper, and (4) open area specialists which prefer Solanum and Cecropia.ConclusionsIndividual preferences for landscape features plus food resource and movement activity were correlated, resulting in different movement syndromes. Individual variation in preferences for landscape elements and food resources highlight the importance of incorporating explicitly the interaction between landscape structure and individual heterogeneity in descriptions of animal movement.

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