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Motivational interviewing interventions aiming to improve health behaviors among cancer survivors: a systematic scoping review.

Authors
  • Seven, Memnun1
  • Reid, Allecia2
  • Abban, Sabriye3
  • Madziar, Camilla4
  • Faro, Jamie M4
  • 1 Elaine Marieb College of Nursing, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 230 Skinner Hall, 651 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA. [email protected].
  • 2 Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Natural Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Tobin 628, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA.
  • 3 Elaine Marieb College of Nursing, University of Massachusetts Amherst, 230 Skinner Hall, 651 North Pleasant Street, Amherst, MA, 01003, USA.
  • 4 Department of Population and Quantitative Health Sciences, University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School, 368 Plantation Street, Worcester, MA, 01605, USA.
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of cancer survivorship : research and practice
Publication Date
Jun 01, 2023
Volume
17
Issue
3
Pages
795–804
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s11764-022-01253-5
PMID: 36100801
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

The scoping review aimed to map out the literature on the utilization of motivational interviewing (MI) to improve health behaviors (i.e., physical activity, nutrition) in adult cancer survivors. This scoping review was conducted following the methods and protocol outlined by the Joanna Briggs Institute Methods Manual. Five databases, including PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and SPORTDiscus, were searched in February 2022 to identify MI interventions to improve health behaviors among cancer survivors. The review included 22 interventions mostly designed to optimize exercise/physical activity (50%). The number of sessions ranged from 2 to 19, and most MI sessions were offered via telephone calls combined with face-to-face sessions (31.8%). Of the interventions, 81.8% improved at least one outcome measurement. Most studies used principles of MI such as empathy expression, developing discrepancy, roll with resistance, and supporting self-efficacy. The use of MI appears to have the potential to improve health behaviors in various settings for individuals on different cancer care trajectories. Healthcare providers can use MI to support physical activity and a healthy diet. Future research should focus on providing evidence on the utilization of MI with minimum standards and longitudinal outcome assessment for developing and maintaining sustainable healthy behaviors. © 2022. The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

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