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Mothers' sociodemographic factors and use of health professionals for child feeding advice.

Authors
  • House, Eve1, 2, 3
  • Xu, Huilan3, 4
  • Taki, Sarah1, 2, 3, 4
  • Denney-Wilson, Elizabeth2, 3, 5
  • Baur, Louise1, 2, 6
  • Wen, Li M1, 2, 3, 4
  • 1 Sydney School of Public Health, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 2 NHMRC Centre of Research Excellence in Translating Early Prevention of Obesity in Childhood (EPOCH-Translate), Sydney, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 3 Sydney Institute for Women, Children and Their Families, Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 4 Health Promotion Unit, Population Health Research & Evaluation Hub, Sydney Local Health District, Sydney, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 5 Susan Wakil School of Nursing and Midwifery, Faculty of Medicine and Health, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
  • 6 Specialty of Child and Adolescent Health, Sydney Medical School, Faculty of Medicine and Health, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia. , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Maternal & child nutrition
Publication Date
Nov 06, 2023
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1111/mcn.13586
PMID: 37932246
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This study examined sociodemographic factors associated with mothers seeking child feeding advice from health professionals (HPs). Cross-sectional analysis of survey data from linked randomized controlled trials was conducted. Surveys asked which sources of feeding information mothers used when their child was 6 months and 5 years old. Logistic regression was used to examine associations between sociodemographic characteristics and use of information from HPs. Here, 947 and 405 mothers completed 6-month and 5-year surveys, respectively. At 6 months, multiparous mothers were less likely to seek advice from child and family health nurses (CFHNs) (adjusted odds ratio [AOR]: 0.558, 95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.416-0.749) and other HPs (AOR: 0.706, 95% CI: 0.542-0.919), unmarried mothers were less likely to seek advice from other HPs (AOR: 0.582, 95% CI: 0.342-0.990). At 5 years, mothers with household income ≥$80,000 p.a. were less likely to seek advice from CFHNs (AOR: 0.514, 95% CI: 0.302-0.875) and working mothers less likely to seek advice from general practitioners (GPs) (AOR: 0.581, 95% CI: 0.374-0.905). Mothers born in Australia were less likely to seek information from CFHNs (AOR: 0.462, 95% CI: 0.257-0.833) and GPs (AOR: 0.431, 95% CI: 0.274-0.677). There was a greater likelihood that multiparous mothers (AOR: 2.114, 95% CI: 1.272-3.516) and mothers of children whose fathers had not attended university (AOR: 2.081, 95% CI: 1.256-3.449) had never sought advice from CFHNs, and that mothers who had not attended university (AOR: 1.769, 95% CI: 1.025-3.051), multiparous (AOR: 1.831, 95% CI: 1.105-3.035) and employed (AOR: 2.058, 95% CI: 1.135-3.733) mothers had never sought advice from other HPs. Understanding sociodemographic factors associated with seeking child feeding advice from HPs may inform priorities for engaging families in health promotion. © 2023 The Authors. Maternal & Child Nutrition published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

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