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Morphological characterization of the breast in Proteus syndrome complicated by ductal carcinoma in situ.

Authors
  • Iqbal, Jabed
  • He, Gary
  • Biesecker, Leslie G
  • Rosen, Peter
  • Duray, Paul H
  • Schwartzentruber, Douglas
  • Beg, Mansor
  • Kahn, Ellen
Type
Published Article
Journal
Annals of clinical and laboratory science
Publication Date
Jan 01, 2006
Volume
36
Issue
4
Pages
469–474
Identifiers
PMID: 17127737
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Proteus syndrome (PS) is a severe, variable, and rare disorder with asymmetric and disproportionate overgrowth of body parts, cerebriform connective tissue nevi, epidermal nevi, dysregulated adipose tissue, and vascular malformations. It is associated with benign and occasionally malignant tumors. We report the first case of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a 28-yr-old woman with PS who underwent a mastectomy for asymmetric overgrowth. The cut surface of the tissue showed a discrete, white, lobulated, solid mass with multiple cysts with occasional small polypoid nodules. Microscopically, the tissue was characterized by neoplastic and non-neoplastic changes. The former consisted of multiple intraductal papillomas and low-grade intraductal papillary, solid, and cribriform carcinoma. The non-neoplastic changes were characterized by cysts of various sizes, lined by cuboidal or apocrine cells, focally with epithelial papillary proliferation; the lumens contained eosinophilic, mucicarmine-positive, and PAS-positive material. Variable ductal proliferation and periductal, peri- and intra-lobular fibrosis with loose fibrous connective tissue was present. The carcinoma was positive for ER, PR, CK7, and MIB-1 (40%), and negative for p53 and CK20 staining. We conclude that DCIS may be one of the tumors associated with PS and that the proliferative phenotype serves as an initiator for carcinogenesis. This case highlights the difficulty of recognizing small foci of carcinoma in an asymmetrical overgrowth of the breast in a young woman with PS.

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