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Monocyte activation in response to polyethylene glycol hydrogels grafted with RGD and PHSRN separated by interpositional spacers of various lengths.

Authors
Type
Published Article
Journal
Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A
Publication Date
Volume
83
Issue
3
Pages
617–625
Identifiers
PMID: 17503491
Source
Medline
License
Unknown

Abstract

Polyethylene glycol (PEG) is often cited as a "stealth" polymer, capable of resisting both protein adsorption and cell adhesion. By extension, PEG would then be expected to limit the host response. Monocyte-derived macrophages play an integral role in inflammation, and thus their response to a material can potentially dictate the overall host response to a biomaterial. In the present study, monocyte responses following interaction with a photopolymerized PEG hydrogel were compared with those from standard tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS). Additionally, the effect of the spacing between RGD and PHSRN, the corresponding synergy sequence on fibronectin (FN), was evaluated using peptides with differing spacer lengths grafted to the PEG hydrogel. Monocyte adherent density on the PEG-only hydrogel was comparable with that of TCPS; however, the secretion of the proinflammatory molecules interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increased dramatically following monocyte interaction with PEG-only hydrogels as compared with TCPS. The matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) concentration was similar for all surfaces, while both the matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and FN concentrations were above the range of the assay for all substrates. Cell density was higher on the PHSRNG(13)RGD grafted substrate as compared with PHSRNG(6)RGD, but neither sequence increased cell density versus RGD alone. Although protein concentration did sometimes vary with different peptides, this variation was minimal in comparison with the surface effects between TCPS and the PEG-only hydrogel. This study explores the roles of PEG and FN-derived peptides on monocyte activation.

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