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Monitoring of trace metal accumulation in two South African farmed mussel species, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Choromytilus meridionalis.

Authors
  • Firth, D C1
  • Salie, K2
  • O'Neill, B1
  • Hoffman, L C3
  • 1 Department of Animal Sciences, Faculty of AgriSciences, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7600, South Africa. , (South Africa)
  • 2 Department of Animal Sciences, Faculty of AgriSciences, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7600, South Africa. Electronic address: [email protected] , (South Africa)
  • 3 Department of Animal Sciences, Faculty of AgriSciences, Stellenbosch University, Private Bag X1, Matieland 7600, South Africa; Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences, Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, University of Queensland, Coopers Plains, QLD 4108, Australia. Electronic address: [email protected] , (Australia)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Marine pollution bulletin
Publication Date
Apr 01, 2019
Volume
141
Pages
529–534
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.marpolbul.2019.03.007
PMID: 30955765
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

Mussels pose health risks to consumers through accumulation of trace metals from the ocean. Saldanha Bay, South Africa, has heavy industry and international shipping, creating concerns over pollution levels for aquaculture facilities. Samples of C. meridionalis and M. galloprovincialis were collected from mussel rafts over two-years and analysed for trace metal content using Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry. Aluminium, Cr, Fe, Zn, Cd and Pb were higher in M. galloprovincialis, while C. meridionalis accumulated more Cu and Mn. Temporal fluctuations occurred for Fe and As concentrations in C. meridionalis, and Fe, As, Hg and Pb in M. galloprovincialis. Arsenic exceeded South African regulatory limits (3 mg/kg) once in each species (max = 3.4 mg/kg w.w.). Lead concentrations in M. galloprovincialis were within EU regulatory limits for bivalves (1.5 mg/kg) but exceeded SA regulatory limits for fish (0.5 mg/kg) four times. Overall, farmed mussels from Saldanha Bay were determined to be safe for human consumption. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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