Affordable Access

Access to the full text

Monitoring of heavy metal pollution in urban and rural environments across Pakistan using House crows (Corvus splendens) as bioindicator

Authors
  • Iqbal, Farheena1, 2
  • Ayub, Qasim1, 3
  • Wilson, Robyn1
  • Song, Beng Kah1
  • Talei, Amin1
  • Yeong, Keng Yoon1
  • Hermawan, Andreas Aditya1
  • Fahim, Muhammad4
  • Rahman, Sadequr1, 1
  • 1 Monash University Malaysia, Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia , Bandar Sunway (Malaysia)
  • 2 University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan , Lahore (Pakistan)
  • 3 Monash University Malaysia Genomics Facility, Bandar Sunway, Selangor Darul Ehsan, Malaysia , Bandar Sunway (Malaysia)
  • 4 Islamia College University, Peshawar, Pakistan , Peshawar (Pakistan)
Type
Published Article
Journal
Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
Publisher
Springer-Verlag
Publication Date
Mar 30, 2021
Volume
193
Issue
4
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1007/s10661-021-08966-7
Source
Springer Nature
Keywords
License
Yellow

Abstract

A widely distributed urban bird, the house crow (Corvus splendens), was used to assess bioavailable heavy metals in urban and rural environments across Pakistan. Bioaccumulation of arsenic (As), zinc (Zn), lead (Pb), cadmium (Cd), nickel (Ni), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), chromium (Cr), and copper (Cu) was investigated in wing feathers of 96 crows collected from eight locations and categorized into four groups pertaining to their geographical and environmental similarities. Results revealed that the concentrations of Pb, Ni, Mn, Cu, and Cr were positively correlated and varied significantly among the four groups. Zn, Fe, Cr, and Cu regarded as industrial outputs, were observed in birds both in industrialized cities and in adjoining rural agricultural areas irrigated through the Indus Basin Irrigation System. Birds in both urban regions accrued Pb more than the metal toxicity thresholds for birds. The house crow was ranked in the middle on the metal accumulation levels in feathers between highly accumulating raptor and piscivore and less contaminated insectivore and granivore species in the studied areas,. This study suggests that the house crow is an efficient bioindicator and supports the feasibility of using feathers to discriminate the local pollution differences among terrestrial environments having different levels and kinds of anthropogenic activities.

Report this publication

Statistics

Seen <100 times