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Molecular Transducers of Human Skeletal Muscle Remodeling under Different Loading States

Authors
  • Stokes, Tanner1
  • Timmons, James A.2
  • Crossland, Hannah3
  • Tripp, Thomas R.4
  • Murphy, Kevin1
  • McGlory, Chris5
  • Mitchell, Cameron J.6
  • Oikawa, Sara Y.1
  • Morton, Robert W.1
  • Phillips, Bethan E.3
  • Baker, Steven K.7
  • Atherton, Phillip J.3
  • Wahlestedt, Claes2
  • Phillips, Stuart M.1
  • 1 Department of Kinesiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
  • 2 Center for Therapeutic Innovation, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA
  • 3 School of Medicine, Royal Derby Hospital, University of Nottingham, Derby, UK
  • 4 Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
  • 5 School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queens University, Kingston, ON, Canada
  • 6 School of Kinesiology, University of British Columbia, BC, Canada
  • 7 Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Department of Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada
Type
Published Article
Journal
Cell Reports
Publisher
Elsevier
Publication Date
Aug 04, 2020
Volume
32
Issue
5
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1016/j.celrep.2020.107980
PMID: 32755574
PMCID: PMC7408494
Source
PubMed Central
Keywords
License
Unknown

Abstract

Stokes et al. identify and validate a core set of genes that are regulated in proportion to the magnitude of muscle protein turnover with loading. Several of these genes correlate with muscle growth only at their 3′ or 5′ untranslated region, and a subset directly influences protein synthesis in vitro .

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