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Molecular screening in a longitudinal cohort of young men who have sex with men and young transgender women: associations with focus on the emerging sexually transmitted pathogen Mycoplasma genitalium.

Authors
  • Munson, Erik1
  • Morgan, Ethan2
  • Sienkiewicz, Laura3
  • Thomas, Yazmine3
  • Buehler, Kathleen4
  • Ryan, Daniel4
  • Clifford, Antonia4
  • Mustanski, Brian5
  • 1 College of Health Sciences, Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.
  • 2 Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA.
  • 3 Marquette University, Milwaukee, Wisconsin, USA.
  • 4 Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing and Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
  • 5 Institute for Sexual and Gender Minority Health and Wellbeing and Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois, USA [email protected]
Type
Published Article
Journal
Sexually transmitted infections
Publication Date
Sep 01, 2021
Volume
97
Issue
6
Pages
434–440
Identifiers
DOI: 10.1136/sextrans-2020-054463
PMID: 33122424
Source
Medline
Keywords
Language
English
License
Unknown

Abstract

This investigation sought to characterise risk factors associated with acquisition of traditional and emerging agents of sexually transmitted infection (STI) in a cohort of young men who have sex with men and transgender women. 917 participants provided urine and rectal swab submissions assessed by transcription-mediated amplification (TMA)-based assays for Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae and by off-label TMA-based Trichomonas vaginalis and Mycoplasma genitalium testing. A subset provided specimens at 6-month and 12-month follow-up visits. Prevalence of M. genitalium from rectal and urine specimens (21.7% and 8.9%, respectively) exceeded that of C. trachomatis (8.8% and 1.6%) and other STI agents. Black participants yielded higher prevalence of M. genitalium (30.6%) than non-black participants (17.0%; χ²=22.39; p<0.0001). M. genitalium prevalence from rectal specimens was 41.5% in HIV-positive participants vs 16.3% in HIV-negative participants (χ²=57.72; p<0.0001). Participant age, gender identity, condomless insertive anal/vaginal sexual practice and condomless receptive anal sexual practice were not associated with rectal C. trachomatis (p≥0.10), N. gonorrhoeae (p≥0.29), T. vaginalis (p≥0.18) or M. genitalium (p≥0.20) detection. While prevalence of T. vaginalis was calculated at ≤1.0%, baseline rectal and urine screening status was predictive of detection/non-detection at follow-up. A non-reactive M. genitalium baseline rectal or urine screening result was less predictive of non-reactive follow-up versus C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhoeae and T. vaginalis. Rectal M. genitalium detection is associated with black race and HIV seropositivity. Baseline M. genitalium infection influences subsequent detection of the organism. © Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2021. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

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